Coloffalon

Coloffalon

Colonoscopy?

Uh, no.  A “coloffalon” is a play on “colophon”.  This, however, is obviously not a traditional print colophon, which would contain publishing information.  It’s not even a traditional web colophon, which would contain information on tools used to develop the site and the web standards the site conformed to.  Instead, I will go over some of the general conventions that this blog will follow here.

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Geography?

The blog will generally focus on restaurants in the greater Los Angeles area.  As I live on the “Westside”, the majority of my dining experiences will naturally occur in local neighborhoods, e.g., Brentwood, Culver City, Mar Vista, Palms, Santa Monica, Venice, West L.A.  However, I do travel on occasion and have made it a personal goal to document offal foods wherever I go.

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Typography?

Since I will be writing blog posts using a variety of hardware and software, I may not easily be able to input proper accents while writing a post.  I’ll strive to be consistent within a post at the least, but a post may say “pate” and “shochu” instead of “pâté” and “shōchū”.

Also, I will generally not italicize non-English terms.  It is tedious to italicize when writing a blog entry, especially if the term is used repeatedly.  Also, only those foreign terms unfamiliar to the reading audience should be italicized, and how should I know what terms my readers are familiar with?  So expect to see “no foie gras after June 30th”, rather than “no foie gras after June 30th”.

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Sociography?

As with italicizing non-English terms, I simply cannot know what ingredients, cooking techniques, or previously-obscure terms my readers may already be familiar with.  Since I’d like my blog to be useful, I’ve decided to err on the side of providing more information, as I’d rather have my more informed readers skim the stuff they already know than have other readers completely lost.

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Photography?

All of the my photographs are taken on an iPhone 4S.  The biggest advantage to the iPhone is that it’s nearly always with me, and is unobtrusive when dining.  The biggest disadvantage is the low-light performance, which is excellent for a camera phone, but still not good enough in darker venues, as I do not use the flash in restaurants.  Of course, it also does not have the manual shutter and aperture controls, but I am experimenting with using it to take close-up shots of food to force depth of field; I do not use faux-DOF filters on my pictures.

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